Washington Child Care Collaborative Task Force

Child care task force

The Child Care Collaborative Task Force (C3TF) was created by the Washington State Legislature in 2018 (SHB 2367) to develop policy recommendations to incentivize employer-supported child care and improve child care access and affordability for employees. Legislation passed in 2019 (2SHB 1344) extended the task force and expanded its scope of work, which will culminate in a June 2021 implementation plan to achieve accessible, affordable child care for all Washington families by 2025.

2019-2021 Task Force Reports and Activities Timeline

Childcare task force timeline

Task Force Reports and Activities

In the first phase of the Child Care Collaborative Task Force’s work—from its first meeting in July 2018 through October 2019—the task force examined the effects of child care affordability and accessibility on the workforce and on businesses. As directed by SHB 2367(2), the task force developed policy recommendations to incentivize employer-supported child care and improve child care access and affordability for employees. Publication date: Nov. 1, 2019

Section 3 of 2SHB 1344 directed the Office of Financial Management (OFM) to survey state executive branch employees in order to better understand issues affecting child care access and affordability for state employees’ families. The legislation directed OFM to develop the survey in partnership with Commerce, the Office of Innovation, Alignment, and Accountability (OIAA) within the Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF), and the Health Care Authority (HCA). Launch by: January 15, 2020

Download the survey

The assessment produced by Section 2 of SHB 1344 will quantify and qualify Washington’s child care industry and identify child care access and facility needs. It is the first task force submission to the Governor and Legislature under 2SHB 1344. The assessment will incorporate results of the state executive branch employee child care access survey (2SHB 1344(3)). Publication date: July 1, 2020

Download the Child Care Collaborative Task Force Industry Assessment Report

 

The child care cost estimate model will help to determine the full costs of providing high quality child care. This report will also include early childhood educator compensation recommendations. By January 1, 2025, the Department of Children, Youth, and Families must use the child care cost model developed under section 6 to determine child care subsidy rates. (2SHB 1344(7)). In addition, the Child Care Cost Estimation Model will include requirements from E2SHB 1391 section 12 veto message. This work will include an analysis of policy options and cost models to support child care providers and the child care workforce and changes to the Working Connections Child Care subsidy program and the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program. Publication date: December 1, 2020

Section 6(e) of 2SHB 1344 directs the Child Care Collaborative Task Force to submit to the Governor and Legislature a strategy, timeline, and implementation plan to reach the goal of accessible, affordable child care for all families by 2025. Publication date: June 1, 2021

Membership

Legislation passed in 2019 (2SHB 1344) updated the membership for the Child Care Collaborative Task Force and added language that the Department of Commerce will jointly convene the task force with the Department of Children Youth and Families.

For a full list of task force members, click here.

    • One representative from a union representing child care providers
    • One representative from the statewide child care resource and referral network
    • One representative of an organization representing the interests of licensed child day care centers
    • One representative of a statewide nonprofit organization comprised of senior executives of major private sector employers
    • One representative of a nongovernmental private-public partnership supporting home visiting service delivery
    • One member from each of the two largest caucuses of the Senate, appointed by the President of the Senate
    • One member from each of the two largest caucuses in the House of Representatives, appointed by the Speaker of the House
    • One representative of a federally recognized tribe
      One representative from an association representing business interests
  • Department of Commerce
  • Department of Children, Youth, and Families representative with expertise in child care subsidy policy
  • Office of the Governor
  • Three representatives from the child care industry. One of the child care industry representatives must be a provider from a rural community. The three representatives must include: One licensed child day care center provider; one licensed family day care provider; and one representative of family, friend, and neighbor child care providers
  • One representative from each of the following: An advocacy organization(s)representing parents, an early learning advocacy organization, a foster care youth advocacy organization and an organization representing expanded learning opportunity interests
  • One representative from the child care workforce development technical work group (chapter 1, Laws of 2017 3rd sp.sess)
  • Early learning policy expert
  • One representative of an organization of early learning providers focused on preserving languages and culture by serving immigrant and refugee communities.

The Director of Commerce or the Secretary of the Department of Children, Youth, and Families or ((his or her)) their designee, may invite additional representatives to participate as nonvoting members of the task force.

Two representatives of economic development organizations, one located east of the crest of the Cascade Mountains and one located west of the crest of the Cascade Mountains.