Community Reinvestment Project

Healing and action for Black, Latine, and tribal communities across our state to build a better WA for everyone.

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WA Department of Commerce’s Community Reinvestment Project (CRP) is a community-designed plan to push resources into communities that were disproportionately harmed by the historical design / enforcement of criminal laws and penalties for drug possession (otherwise known as the war on drugs).

With over $90 million already contracted for reentry services, violence prevention, legal assistance, and economic development, we are making significant strides in repairing past harm. Our work is also collaborating with community partners to fund career coaching, job training, tuition assistance, and a monthly stipend of $1,000 for those who are underemployed and pursuing their career goals.

Please click below to learn more about our work, programs, registration, and open grant opportunities.

Open Grants and Funding Opportunities

We currently have three grants open to non-profit organizations, faith-based organizations, financial organizations, youth coaches, and fiscally sponsored community groups that are working on getting their 501(c)(3) status.

If you are an individual or small business looking for support, scroll further down the page to learn about what CRP-funded resources are available to you through our partners & collaborators.

Commerce is requesting proposals from applicants qualified and interested in receiving loan capital to reduce monthly mortgage payments and/or increase capital for Black, Latine, and tribal communities harmed by the historic design and enforcement for drug possession. For further details, see the Notice of Funding Opportunity.

  • Applicants must be registered as a CRP verified by-and-for organization, or be contractually partnered with a CRP verified by-and-for organization, to deliver the Objectives and Scope of Work identified in this NOFA. To learn more about registration, visit https://bit.ly/crpwareg
  • Federally recognized tribal nations in Washington state are automatically eligible to apply, and do not need to register as or partner with a CRP-verified by-and-for organization. 

Applications Open:
May 1, 2024

Question & Answer Period:
May 1, 2024 – May 25, 2024

Applications Close:
June 1, 2024 at 3pm

View or download the RFP to learn more about this grant.

If you have questions about this grant, contact Cristy Kraus at houapplication@commerce.wa.gov.

Commerce is initiating a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Black, Latine, and tribal-led lending agency support program. The program aims to support existing and emerging Black, Latine and tribal-led lenders by providing grants for lending capital, as well as capital for operations and salaries.

  • Applicants do not need to currently be a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFIs)
  • Applicants must be or partner with a CRP-verified by-and-for organization. Learn more about registration at https://bit.ly/crpwareg.
  • All federally recognized tribal nations in Washington state are automatically eligible to apply and do not need to register as a CRP-verified by-and-for organization.

Applications Open:
May 1, 2024

Question & Answer Period:
May 1, 2024 – May 25, 2024

Applications Close:
June 1, 2024 at 3pm

View or download the RFP to learn more about this grant.

If you have questions about this funding opportunity, contact Cristy Kraus at houapplication@commerce.wa.gov.

Commerce is seeking applications for CRP’s Youth Coach Training Grant, which will fund training for youth sports coaches, parents, and volunteers in social emotional learning and trauma sensitive practices. The funding can also help remove financial barriers for youth by covering costs like registration fees and equipment expenses.

What your organization can apply for:

  • Small Teams or Programs (12 to 20 youth) can apply for up to $25,000
  • Medium Teams or Programs (21 to 50 youth) can apply for up to $50,000
  • Large Teams (over 50 youth) can apply for up to $75,000
  • Joint Application (where sports teams and training providers collaborate) up to $100,000

To qualify for this grant, applicants must be:

  • A tribal government or tribal-led community based organization; OR
  • Rooted in, work in. or be deeply partnered with Black, Latine, and tribal communities in WA AND
  • Licensed to do business in Washington or submit a statement of commitment that it will become licensed in Washington within thirty (30) calendar days of being selected as the Apparently Successful Applicant.

General Community Pre-Proposal Webinar from May 21, 2024

Watch the webinar
Passcode: fFj5Yq^h

Pre-Proposal Webinar for prospective tribal applicants, tribal-led 501(c)3s, tribal-led community-based organizations, and tribal governments on May 23, 2024

Watch the webinar
Passcode: r4wp19=E

View the slides from the webinar (PDF)

Review the Request for Applications (PDF)
Download the application (Word)

Please contact the RFA coordinator, Sherina James with any questions about this grant.

Blended Capital Enhancement
The Washington State Department of Commerce has a new way to help people and businesses through the Community Reinvestment Project (CRP). It’s called the Blended Capital Enhancement grant, and it aims to reduce wealth disparities by helping Black, Latine, and tribal communities build assets. The program will help with:

  • Making it easier for people to buy a home.
  • Providing grants and loans for small businesses and entrepreneurs.
  • Money management training
  • Funding training and support for small businesses.
  • Assisting with buying commercial property, business assets, and vehicles.
  • Helping people reduce debt and save more using matching funds.

The goal of this grant is to make it easier for Black, Latine, and tribal communities to get extra financial support from local organizations and businesses in their community.

What does funding look like?

A total of $37 million is available for this grant, with specific allocations reserved for various purposes, including:

  • New construction loans: $5 million
  • Home expansion loans (including Accessory Dwelling Units or ADUs): $6 million
  • Business startups and expansions: $5 million
  • Consumer loans (like credit consolidation, car refinancing, or emergency expenses): $1 million

We are currently seeking your feedback about this grant. Please take a look at our RFQ and let the team know your thoughts over email. Community, this funding is for you! 

Support for the Individuals & Small Businesses

Are you a Black, Latine, urban Indian, or tribal community member in WA who needs some support?  Check out our comprehensive list of CRP-funded service providers who are here to help you with your goals and dreams. 

Press the + or – to open up each category. 

Led by Northwest Credible Messengers. Funded by the Community Reinvestment Project

The Barber & Beauty Shop Community of Practice aims to train barber and beauty ​shops to provide peer support services while ​facilitating transformative engagement processes ​with the customers they serve.

Participants will go through accelerated ​training in order to learn to provide behavioral ​health support services. Barbers and beauticians will be compensated $2,000 per completed training (up to $4,000) with the aim of supporting barbers and beauticians with more sustainable funding streams.

Now accepting applications. Click to learn more.

If you are interested in the EcSA Career Accelerator for un/deremployed individuals, please contact your local workforce agency and ask to learn more.

Pacific Mountain WDC – Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Thurston
Dan Cooling
dan@pacmtn.org

WorkForce Development Council of Seattle-King County
Mike Davie
mdavie@seakingwdc.org

Gyanendra Subba
gsubba@seakingwdc.org

Future WorkForce Alliance (Snohomish)
Cassondra Yi
cassondra.yi@workforcesnohomish.org

Northwest Workforce Council (Whatcom, Skagit, Island, San Juan)
Malinda Bjaaland
Mbjaaland@workforcenorthwest.org

SkillSource (Adams, Chelan, Grant, Douglas, Okanogan)
Susan Adams
susana@skillsource.org

Eastern Washington Partnership (Asotin, Columbia, Ferry, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Stevens, Walla Walla, Whitman)
Rod Van Alyne
rvanalyne@ruralresources.org

Spokane Workforce Council (Spokane)
Andrea Hixson
ahixson@spokaneworkforce.org

Benton-Franklin WDC (Benton, Franklin)
Jessie Cardwell
jcardwell@bf-wdc.org

South Central Workforce Council (Kittitas, Klickitat, Skamania, Yakima)
Meranda Smith
meranda.smith@scworkforce.org

WorkForce Central (Pierce)
Danielle Thompson
dthompson@workforce-central.org

Workforce Southwest Washington (Clark, Cowlitz, Wahkiakum)
Mando Antonino
mantonino@workforcesw.org

Want to download a map of all our WWA partners? Download here (PDF).

If you are interested EcSA Business Support program for small businesses, please contact your local workforce agency and ask to learn more.

Pacific Mountain WDC – Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Thurston
Dan Cooling
dan@pacmtn.org

WorkForce Development Council of Seattle-King County
Mike Davie
mdavie@seakingwdc.org

Gyanendra Subba
gsubba@seakingwdc.org

Future WorkForce Alliance (Snohomish)
Cassondra Yi
cassondra.yi@workforcesnohomish.org

Northwest Workforce Council (Whatcom, Skagit, Island, San Juan)
Malinda Bjaaland
Mbjaaland@workforcenorthwest.org

SkillSource (Adams, Chelan, Grant, Douglas, Okanogan)
Susan Adams
susana@skillsource.org

Eastern Washington Partnership (Asotin, Columbia, Ferry, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Stevens, Walla Walla, Whitman)
Rod Van Alyne
rvanalyne@ruralresources.org

Spokane Workforce Council (Spokane)
Andrea Hixson
ahixson@spokaneworkforce.org

Benton-Franklin WDC (Benton, Franklin)
Jessie Cardwell
jcardwell@bf-wdc.org

South Central Workforce Council (Kittitas, Klickitat, Skamania, Yakima)
Meranda Smith
meranda.smith@scworkforce.org

WorkForce Central (Pierce)
Business Solutions
BusinessSolutions@workforce-central.org

Workforce Southwest Washington (Clark, Cowlitz, Wahkiakum)
Mando Antonino
mantonino@workforcesw.org

Want to download a map of all our WWA partners? Download here (PDF).

About CRP: History, Values, and More

In 2022, the Legislature created the Community Reinvestment Account, setting aside $200 million to address racial, economic, and social disparities created by the historic design and enforcement of state and federal criminal laws and penalties for drug possession (the war on drugs). The Legislature directed that the Department of Commerce (Commerce) invest the funds in four program areas: economic development, civil and criminal legal assistance, community-based violence intervention and prevention services, and reentry services.

Commerce – in partnership with the WA Office of Equity – worked with communities across the state to develop a Community Reinvestment Plan laying out recommendations for how these funds will be invested over the next biennium (July 1, 2023 – June 30, 2025).

The Community Reinvestment Plan recommended Commerce distribute $200 million across the state through more than 17 individual grant programs in the four program areas. Subject matter experts are currently administering the grant programs across several Commerce units and divisions and in other state agencies. Some of the grant programs included in the Community Reinvestment Plan are expansions of existing programs – implementation will be relatively quick and easy. Some of the programs represent new ideas, requiring more time and collaboration to implement. 

To learn more about the plan, please read the full breakdown of the proposed programs (PDF). To read the full plan, download the Community Reinvestment Plan (PDF).

The harm from unjust practices requires healing and action. Structural racism was, and still is, directly embedded in past and present criminal laws and penalties for drug possession – both in WA and across the nation. We also must be honest that these policies targeted and inversely impacted Black, Latine, and tribal residents of Washington. As a result, CRP funding must prioritize those communities in order to begin undo harm and building a better Washington state for all.

We also must recognize the harm that carries over between generations within families and support steps toward intergenerational healing – recognizing the mental, spiritual and embodied impacts of the war on drugs. Harm does not just include physical detention and incarceration, but also over-surveillance, over-policing, over-incarceration, and over-sentencing present throughout the criminal legal process.

We must connect community-level harm with community-level listening and consider harm from not just an individual level, but a community-level perspective. We must acknowledge that existing public datasets might not adequately capture the kinds of harm and impacts that communities have experienced and continue to experience.

With funding distributed through Commerce, the Community Reinvestment Project will support 17 different grant programs. Each of the program managers will distribute the funds in accordance with the Community Reinvestment Plan, with several inter-agency and external partners.

  • Employment Security Department – $25 million to provide workforce and small business services.
  • Office of Civil Legal Aid – $8 million to fund legal representation and vacating criminal records and legal financial obligation relief.
  • Department of Commerce – $167 million to support violence prevention, reentry services, and economic development.

Economic Development

$138 million. Our economic development grants address wealth disparities by promoting asset building, such as home ownership and expanding access to grants / loans for small businesses and entrepreneurs. Available grants are built on four strategic sets of investments: subsidized lending, financial assistance, outreach and support and workforce development.

Violence Prevention

$30 million over four program areas. Programs will consist of violence prevention and intervention services, Community Healing, Youth Sports Capacity Building and Barber/Beauty Shop Health Navigation programs.

Reentry Services

$12 million. A criminal record creates a lifetime of barriers for impacted individuals and their families. The Community Reinvestment Plan recommended funding for civil and criminal legal assistance to provide post-conviction relief and case assistance.

Facilitated by community-based organizations, our reentry grants focus on improving transitions from incarceration by providing access to services including housing, employment, education, legal aid, transportation, communication, and basic needs. 

Legal Assistance

$8 million. CRP’s legal assistance grants assist with vacating criminal records, legal financial obligations relief, and legal representation. Decades of federal, state, and local policies and practices that disproportionately targeted Black, Latine and tribal communities have made criminal records much more common and difficult to navigate.

How CRP defines a by-and-for organization

CRP prioritizes funding to by-and-for organizations that are led by and for Black, Latine, and tribal communities in Washington state. CRP also emphasizes working with nonprofit, faith-based, and grassroots organizations.


As defined by the Office of Equity, to qualify as by-and-for for purposes of the Community Reinvestment Project, an organization must:

    • Be part of, rooted in, and defined by the identity of the Black, Latine, tribal community;
    • Have leadership and staff who belong to the Black, Latine or tribal community; and
    • Have roots in their communities as change agents and providers of mitigating systems of community service;
    • Invest in and work with community members to improve their quality of life.

Geographic Consideration

As dictated by the Community Reinvestment Plan (PDF), approximately 64% of CRP funding will be directed towards communities in counties that experienced disproportional harm during the war on drugs. Our analysis of crime, incarceration, and economic data revealed that Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane and Yakima are the state’s top six counties in need. Remaining funding will be distribution across other counties throughout WA. 

The Community Reinvestment Project must demonstrate significant long-term economic benefits to the state, a region, or a specific community within the state. Measuring outcomes involves carefully assessing and tracking the economic impact of various investments over time. This will include factors such as new job creation, job retention, increased personal wealth, and higher incomes for individuals and families. Impacts on wealth disparities will be realized by actions designed to promote asset building, such as home ownership, and expanding access to financial resources, including but not limited to grants and loans for small businesses and entrepreneurs, financial literacy training, and other small business training and support activities.

The success and effectiveness of the Community Reinvestment Program will be determined by the geographic and demographic impact of the distribution of the funds to individuals and families harmed by the war on drugs.

Each grant program will have Key Performance Indicators reported out using a consolidated accountable and transparent reporting mechanism. Data points unique to each grant program will measure and allow us to understand outcomes. The Community Reinvestment Plan implementation will integrate racial equity considerations in all outreach and contractual programs and practices, and be a catalyst for change to traditional Commerce practices and systems. To be successful, the Community Reinvestment Plan implementation will require intentional, regular and transparent communication internally within Commerce and externally with other state agencies, grantees, potential grantees, and community partners.

To learn about the CRP plan, download the PDF.

Download a PDF of the Community Reinvestment Plan, which is the foundation of our ongoing work.

Learn more about our ongoing work and more on our Collaboration Dashboard.

Join us for Office Hours

If you would like to meet virtually with our team regarding any questions you have about the CRP or our programs, you can sign-up for our Office Hours! CRP Office Hours are held every other Thursday from 12:00pm-12:30pm over Zoom. 

Upcoming Office Hours
May 30, 2024
June 13, 2024
June 27, 2024
July 11, 2024

Please visit this registration link to sign up. We look forward to hearing from you!

Support for Individuals and Small Businesses

There are CRP-funded resources for individuals and small businesses. Get connected with your local workforce development board today. 

Get in touch with the Small Business Resiliency Network, visit their web page.

Subscribe

Sign up to our email list to receive updates from the Community Reinvestment Project.

Contact Us

Please visit our contact form to connect with the CRP Team. We will get back to you within 2-5 business days.

CRP Core Staff

  • Korbett Mosesly, Managing Director (he/him)
  • Cristi Devers, Co-Lead (she/her)
  • Sherina James, Co-Lead (she/her)
  • Krista Perez, Contract Manager (she/her/ella)
  • Mahkyra Gaines, Contract Manager (they/them)
  • Elijah Benn, Barber and Beauty Peer Program Manager
  • Dr. Timmie Foster, Coaching Capacity Program Manager (Dr. Timmie/Dr. Foster)
  • Mackenzie Rodgers, Contract Specialist (she/her)