Statewide Reentry Council Members

Francis Adewale

Francis Adewale

Representing a statewide organization for public defenders.
Francis Adewale is one of the attorneys that helped establish Spokane Community Court. He has served as chair of Refugee Connections Spokane and co-chair of Spokane Homeless Coalition. He is currently vice president of JustLead Washington. He was appointed by Governor Jay Inslee to a three-year term as a member of the Washington Statewide Reentry Council in 2016 and reappointed for another 3-year term in 2019. He’s the current chair of the Access to Justice Board and a member of Washington State Supreme Court’s Interpreters Commission. Francis is H. George Frederickson Honors Graduate of Eastern Washington University and was admitted to the Washington State Bar in June 2000. Francis was born in southwest Nigeria.  He has served as Assistant Public Defender for the City of Spokane since May 2001. In addition to his work as a city public defender, Francis serves on several community-based boards and activities in Eastern Washington. A Fellow of Washington State Bar Association Leadership Institute (WLI) and ATJ Equal Justice Leadership Academy.  Francis is a recipient of the City of Spokane Human Rights Award, Washington Criminal Defense Lawyers’ President Award and Spokane County Bar Association Smithmoore P. Myers Professionalism Award. Francis and other team members of Spokane Community Court are recipients of the 2018 WSBA Apex Award.

Assistant Secretary Danielle Armbruster

Danielle Armbruster

Representative of the Department of Corrections (DOC)
Danielle Armbruster began her career with the Department of Corrections in September 1996 as a Clerk Typist 2 and was promoted through increasing levels of responsibility from accounting to the general manager of Correctional Industries at Stafford Creek Corrections Center. Armbruster also served as a board member with the National Correctional Industries Association (NCIA) and recently served as the NCIA’s Western Region chair. Armbruster is the 2012 recipient of the Secretary’s Leadership Award.

Lydia Flora Barlow

Lydia Flora Barlow

Co-Chair, Representing a statewide or local organization for business and employers
Lydia Flora Barlow is the Managing Director of the Secure Retirement Trust, which provides retirement benefits to SEIU 775 homeware workers. She has retirement operations management, product development and actuarial experience from SAFECO and Symetra Financial, where she was most recently a Senior Vice President of Retirement Products. Barlow holds a B.S. in Statistics and an M.S. in Biostatistics from the University of Washington. In addition to serving on the MMBB board of managers, she serves on the board of trustees of the American Baptist Seminary of the West, is a governor appointee to the Washington Statewide Re-entry Council and founded Fabian’s Fund to fund higher education for imprisoned and re-entering community members. Barlow is an American Baptist Missionary with a focus on higher education in prison. She is also a member of Mount Zion Baptist Church, Seattle, WA. MMBB service began in 2017.

Lt. Kim Bogucki

Lt. Kim Bogucki

Community Leader
 A 32-year veteran of the Seattle Police Department, Detective Kim Bogucki is a globally recognized leader in creating innovative partnerships between police and community members that promote dialogue, mutual understanding, public safety, and justice. In high demand as a consultant and speaker, Bogucki has conducted numerous trainings both nationally and overseas, keynoted at various conferences and events, and has delivered three popular TEDx talks.  (You can watch this particularly relevant one here:  Us versus them | Kim Bogucki | TEDxPennsylvaniaAvenue.)

In an attempt to bridge the divide between police and some homeless youth in Seattle, Bogucki developed the Donut Dialogues, which was a big hit with both kids and police while dispelling many misperceptions each had about the other. She has also used the engaging play of West Side Story to bring young people together with law enforcement to address issues like gang violence, immigration, police and youth relations and the juvenile justice system.

Bogucki is most widely known as co-founder of The IF Project, a unique and highly effective collaboration of law enforcement, current and previously incarcerated adults and community partners focused on intervention, prevention, and reduction in incarceration and recidivism. The work is built upon – and inspired by – people sharing their raw, personal experiences around incarceration and building programs from these expert voices.

Currently, Bogucki is a fellow with NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management. In this work, she helps policymakers and government agencies identify problems, develop innovative solutions, and test them using rigorous research methods. Her current project evaluates environmental design to see whether adjustments to light, sound, and color inside prisons can lower anxiety and stress and decrease infractions and time spent in segregation.

Gov. Inslee appointed Bogucki to sit on the Reentry and Ending Youth Homelessness task forces. Kim has been a part of a gender-responsive initiative with the Washington State Department of Corrections. She serves as officer liaison to the LGBTQ community. She was a recent member of the Greater Seattle Business Association board of directors and currently sits on the Washington State Correctional Industries board and is a Seattle University’s Criminal Justice advisory council member.

Bogucki has received numerous awards for her work, including The Red Cross Heroes Award, the Seattle Storm’s (WNBA) Women that Inspire Award, the Center for Children’s Youth and Justice President’s Award, the Seattle Police Foundation Excellence Award, the Department of Corrections Volunteer of the Year at Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW), the Greater Seattle Business Association (GSBA) Community Leader Award, The Seattle Reign FC Legends Award and Washington State Mentors Association Unsung Heroes Award. 

Victor Estrada biopic

Victor Estrada

Community Leader
Victor Estrada is a formerly incarcerated person, as well as a person in long-term recovery. In 2015, he turned his life around and set his sights on deciding his life's purpose. This led to his involvement in advocating for people in recovery. Victor used his experience as a previously incarcerated person to let state representatives know that incarceration was never the changing factor. He argued that there need to be more treatment options for individuals because incarceration does nothing to correct a person's behaviors. Mr. Estrada recently started working as a recovery coach inside a local jail working with individuals to give them hope and offer some new ideas upon release. He also works with the local juvenile facility to mentor individuals looking for a way out of the gang lifestyle. Additionally, Victor is the Chairperson for Central Washington Recovery Coalition and a former board member for Washington Recovery Alliance.  He is a strong voice for the Recovery community.

Durell Green

Durell Green

Appointee with experience reentering the community after incarceration
Durell Green is a community advocate born in Tacoma, Washington. He began his work volunteering for a faith-based Gang Reduction Intervention Program called Partnering for Youth Achievement in Bremerton, where he soon began developing curriculum and was appointed as the Street Outreach coordinator.

His lived experience as a child funneled through the school-to-prison pipeline is the main motivating factor behind his work in restorative justice with Choose 180. He believes strongly in learning and recovering from mistakes, building resiliency and community. He has been able to use his power of choice to pivot in a direction to serve his purpose.

Lt. Ian Huri

Lt. Ian Huri

Representative of a statewide organization for law enforcement interests
Ian Huri has been in law enforcement for 17 years and is currently assigned as the Operations Bureau Chief with the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office. Ian holds a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice from Washington State University and a Master’s of Science in Management and Leadership from Western Governors University. In 2015 Ian helped develop one of the first programs that helped embed social workers with law enforcement to address chemical dependency, mental health and homelessness. The early success of that program has helped reduce recidivism by addressing the root issues leading individuals into the justice system and instead diverting them into social services.

Ayodele (Ayo) Idowu

Ayodele (Ayo) Idowu

Representing faith-based organizations or communities
Ayo Idowu has been a resident of Southwest Washington (Clark County) for over 13 years and has been a Prison Fellowship volunteer at a local state prison (Larch Correction Center) for over 11 years.

Through this volunteer opportunity, Ayo has had the privilege to witness countless men reenter society with support from individuals and faith-based organizations, like the church he currently attends (Faith Center Church) and other organizations like Grace Ministries/XChange Recovery Ministries, to provide resources and assistance, for reentry and re-engagement into society.  Ayo Idowu was appointed by the WA State Governor to be on the WA State Reentry Council in 2019 and was reappointed for another two years. Ayo is passionate about seeing incarcerated lives changed through successful reentry, including encouragement, service and partnership with faith-based organizations. Ayo believes that representing Southwest Washington on the Reentry Council provides the opportunity to continue supporting reentry and education programs and partner with faith-based communities to provide Washington with resources to assist the incarcerated be successful outside the walls of prisons. Ayo is interested in supporting individuals being released and has equal concern for the community and the families and victims of these individuals, believing that representing the Reentry Council's purpose will help achieve that balance.

Karen Turner Lee, CEO, Pioneer Human Services

Karen Lee

Representing housing providers
Karen is the Chief Executive Officer of Pioneer Human Services, which is located in Seattle, Washington.  She has held this position since 2010. One of the nation’s largest social enterprise organizations, Pioneer’s mission is recovery, rehabilitation and quality jobs for individuals overcoming the challenges of criminal legal system involvement.  Pioneer delivers evidence-based, person-focused services, provides transitional, supportive, and permanent housing, and offers jobs and career opportunities at all of its business enterprises.  Pioneer’s relentless advocacy efforts aim to reduce the stigma and disparate impacts of involvement in the criminal legal system. In the legislative arena, Pioneer has played a pivotal role in limiting discriminatory housing and employment practices.  Pioneer has five business enterprises, three non-profit program divisions and serves over 10,000 individuals annually throughout Washington state.  Before working at Pioneer, Karen was appointed the Commissioner of the Employment Security Department by Gov. Christine Gregoire, a post she held for five years.  A US Army Veteran, Karen is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and the University of Washington School of Law. 

Linda Olsen

Linda Olsen

Representative of a statewide organization supporting the interests of crime victims
Linda Olsen is the Housing Program Director with the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She coordinated the Domestic Violence Housing First pilot project, which tested housing stability strategies for survivors of domestic violence. This project has evolved into a five-year demonstration project focusing on systems change and measuring long-term outcomes for survivors and their children. Linda has worked in the domestic violence field for over 30 years, serving as shelter director and executive director at two domestic violence agencies. She facilitated the opening of two domestic violence emergency shelters, developed a transitional housing program for survivors with drug/alcohol treatment needs and piloted rental assistance programs for DV survivors. Linda is also a member of the State Advisory Council on Homelessness. In 2012, through University Beyond Bars, Linda started volunteering at the Washington State Reformatory in Monroe, teaching “Understanding Family Violence.” This experience was extremely rewarding and led to being a sponsor for the Concerned Lifers Organization. Linda has graduate degrees in theology and social work. 

Carment Pacheco-Jones

Carmen Pacheco-Jones

Co-Chair, Appointee with experience reentering the community after incarceration
Carmen Pacheco-Jones is a Co-Founder and Director of Health and Justice Recovery Alliance, the founder of Awaken Legacy Consulting and a formerly incarcerated individual. She has dedicated herself to transforming the criminal legal system to create equity and justice for all impacted. Pacheco-Jones serves as a Health Program Specialist for the Black Health Initiative contracting with the Department of Children, Youth and Families, Empire Health Foundation and Providence Health Systems. Carmen also serves as a member of Spokane’s Regional Law and Justice Council and is the former Chair of their Racial Equity Committee. Carmen is engaged in other roles, including board vice president of Northwest Justice Project, Legal Foundation of WA Race Equity Grant’s Advisory Committee, Board member of WA State Budget and Policy Council, and Advisory member of Treatment First WA Council.

Carmen also formerly served as the Mental Health Promotion and Suicide Prevention Coordinator with Washington State University. She is a State Certified Trainer in Diversity and Social Cognition, Certified Forensic Peer Counselor, Community Health Worker, Whitworth graduate and Masters Candidate in Education with Gonzaga University. Carmen believes that it is critical to organize around the barriers that impact the formerly incarcerated and individuals with lived experience— access to school, employment, housing–everything that impacts people in re-entry needs to be accessible to all.

King County Prosecutor Daniel Satterberg

Daniel Satterberg

Representing a statewide organization for prosecutors
Dan Satterberg was elected King County Prosecuting Attorney in November 2007 to succeed his longtime friend and mentor, the late Norm Maleng. He was re-elected in 2010 and 2014 without opposition. Dan served as Chief of Staff for Norm Maleng for 17 years and was responsible for the management and operation of the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, including budget, human resources, technology, legislative and policy matters. The Prosecuting Attorney’s Office employs more than 235 attorneys, 240 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $69 million.

Dan is committed to the reform of the Criminal Justice system. He has launched successful programs to keep youth in school, divert youth from the courtroom, deal with drug-addicted people more effectively, and give police additional tools for responding to low-level offenders with mental health issues. Dan also believes that we need to do more to help people leaving prison make the successful transition from offender to taxpayer. He is committed to reducing recidivism among people leaving jail and prison. All of these reforms are possible, he believes, with the partnership of the community.

Dan was born and raised in South King County and attended Highline High School. His father was a lawyer in White Center, and his mother was a nursing instructor at Highline Community College. He graduated from the UW undergraduate school (Political Science and Journalism) and the UW Law School.

Patricia Seibert-Love

Patricia Seibert-Love

Representative of a statewide organization for community and technical colleges
Patricia Seibert-Love (Pat) has an extensive background in both the community and technical college and Department of Corrections systems, with expertise in teaching, training, and leadership. She is committed to the community college system as an avenue for social justice and creating pathways to change lives, especially for individuals who have experienced incarceration. Pat has had the opportunity to work in both correctional and college environments. Her experience includes over 20 years as a correctional employee from entry-level through executive leadership and over 20 years of instruction, curriculum development, teaching, learning, assessment and advising experience. 

Pat’s current role includes supporting justice-involved individuals with educational opportunities from adult basic skills (GED and competency-based High School Diploma), pre-college to post-secondary education. She engages in legislative action to increase equitable access to quality education for the student population. Pat aims to reduce recidivism by providing innovative, engaging and robust education and promoting sustainable living-wage employment opportunities, thus reducing the prison population and creating safe and healthy community restoration.

Winona Stevens

Winona Stevens

Tribal Affairs Representative
Winona Stevens is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin. She has been the Program Manager for the Dept. of Correction’s Native American Religious Program since 2013. She is responsible for the religious services across 21 Native American Circles across Washington State.

Winona received her Master’s Degree in Social Work at the University of Washington. In addition to facilitating the Department of Corrections Native circles activities, she has held many positions, including Adjunct Professor at Northwest Indian College, New Directions Anger Management Group Facilitator, and White Bison Recovery Coach for Intergenerational Trauma and the 12 Step Medicine Wheel Program for Men and Women. Mrs. Stevens directed efforts in working closely with tribal communities and currently serves on several boards, including Huy, Council for First Inhabitants Rights and Equality, and the University of Washington’s Native American Advisory Board.

Her commitment to serving the Native American population impacted by incarceration led her to recently launch HEAL for Reentry (Helping Enhance Aboriginal Lives), a nonprofit committed to assisting tribal people upon release from prison.